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Experience hit singles from Joni Mitchell, Miley Cyrus and Savage Garden like you’ve never heard them before

You know the saying: What’s old is new again… and covers are all the rage right now, (we see you, Kelly Clarkson and Ritt Momney) but 1990s nostalgia is even hotter, so of course the two are going to converge. Thank COVID quarantine, thank recycling, or just thank simple nostalgia for the fact that there’s no shortage of killer ’90s cover songs available for streaming right now. There’s also no shortage of new music to keep us all busy and entertained during lockdown, but a little trip down memory lane never hurt anyone.

When you’re tired of the new (and incredible) Miley record or the 13 new Taylor Swift albums released in the past year, check out some of these hidden gems, some from the ’90s, some not, that are giving old-school classics a fresh dose of energy and relevance. …


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His latest release solidifies a more mature sound and tackles themes related to love, adulthood and fame in the year 2020

Shawn Mendes is growing up. The 22-year-old singer-songwriter is coming into his own, honing his sound, and finally turning into the superstar pop singer he’s been trying to be for years.

On his 2018 self-titled LP (his third), he finally evolved past his blandly sweet-yet-forgettable coffee shop singer-songwriter sound for something more cohesive, current and mature. Prior to Shawn Mendes, his most successful singles were often his most obviously pop-leaning productions infused with a healthy dose of rock sensibility thanks to frequent collaborator Teddy Geiger.


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JoJo, “December Baby”

The pop singer’s album is an impassioned and soulful triumph in a sea of holiday releases.

Put the skulls and witches’ brooms away; celebrities are here to usher us into the next great holiday season with a fresh batch of Christmas and holiday releases full of good (and bad) cheer.

Nevermind Carly Rae Jepsen’s new Christmas single or Tori Kelly’s festive album—actually, don’t nevermind them; they’re both great… but I digress. The ultimate modern Christmas album is here courtesy of the one and only JoJo, who can do no wrong, and apparently never stops to even consider doing something wrong. …


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Credit: Alex Knight, Unsplash: https://unsplash.com/photos/j4uuKnN43_M

The “golden age” of TV and an abundance of multimedia streaming services have ushered in an overwhelming new era of constant content. Who could possibly keep up?

Have you seen that new Netflix docuseries? You know… the one about food?

How about “Lovecraft Country”?

You’re up to date on “The Handmaid’s Tale,” right?

Are you excited for the Playstation 5 and Xbox Series X?

Have you heard Katy Perry’s new album? I hear it’s pretty good.

Mariah Carey is releasing a memoir! You have time in your schedule for that, right?

I know I don’t.

We might be confined to our homes more than ever, with Netflix, Spotify, Audible, Disney Plus, and a hundred other streaming platforms to keep us entertained—But it feels more like a burden than a blessing these days. Surely you know the struggle; just when you’ve finished your last binge, your last book, your last podcast, there’s something else that you just have to experience, according to your friends, family, and certified pop culture critics alike. …


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I heard that you like the bad girls, honey, is that true?

When you talk about something coming out of left field, there’s really a range of unexpectedness at play; there’s “Beyoncé’s surprise album drop” left field, there’s “I had no idea my husband was cheating on me” left field… and then there’s “Trixie Mattel covers a Lana Del Rey song” left field. An unlikely collision of musicians that seems so impossible, so wrong… and so, so right.

It has no right to work, but it absolutely does.

Wielding her trusty autoharp and serving us lewks with her face painted to the gods as usual, Mattel comes out of left field all the way from Wisconsin to put her signature spin on Del Rey’s iconic first hit. If you’re anything like me, you probably can’t even imagine what that would sound like. Does Trixie Mattel still work when slowed down and filtered through an empty bottle of Xanax? Luckily we might never need to find out, as Mattel’s spin on “Video Games” drops the heavy-handed solemnity for something a little… lighter. The song, which originally sounded like a dreary and yearning ode to loving dudes who like cheap beer, is transformed into a hypnotic midtempo country ballad that’s equal parts sexy, sad and fun. …


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If you’re looking for more sexy midtempo R&B, you came to the right place

It’s been just over three years since SZA dropped her (justly) much-lauded album Ctrl, and unless you count her appearance on the Black Panther and Trolls World Tour soundtracks, we haven’t really seen much from her since.

After a brief beef (or maybe just misunderstanding?) with her label over the status of her new material, SZA surprised the world tonight by dropping a new single, “Hit Different,” and its accompanying video.

Sounding like it came straight from the Ctrl recording sessions, and paired with a tame feature from Ty Dolla $ign, this new track serves up more of the midtempo R&B we’ve come to expect from SZA, with a keen eye and a soft spot for red flags in bad relationships. This time, however, she’s fully aware that this relationship doesn’t quite work, even if there’s just something about the guy that hits different. There’s perhaps a hint of growth in her perspective here, as she considers that even if this relationship isn’t different than the rest, something inside her recognizes that this dude is different than the rest. …


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The app has quickly become a powerhouse in viral music promotion

By now, you’ve heard of TikTok, either through word of mouth, resharing of its short viral clips, or maybe during COVID-19 isolation, your kids have roped you into dancing in a video or two.

The app, which really exploded onto the scene in 2019, asks that users record short clips of themselves set to music. It’s a deceptively simple concept that has resulted in surprising creativity from the app’s userbase and has, less surprisingly, catapulted songs into the cultural consciousness through the sheer power of online virality. …


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Photo by Spencer Imbrock on Unsplash

Now is the perfect time to redefine our definition of what’s popular— again

The 1990s: a time of unprecedented economic growth, questionable fashion choices, and the unstoppable reign of MTV. It was also a time of rapid expansion and evolution of the musical landscape as new genres like grunge and ska bursted onto the scene, and old genres like swing music experienced unexpected revivals. It was a wild time, and MTV served as the ultimate tool to bring this buffet of new options to the masses. …


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courtesy: britneyspears.com

This is a story about a girl named Lucky

Leave Britney alone.

You’ve heard it before, and I’m here to make absolutely sure you hear it again.

Leave Britney alone.

If you’ve been paying any attention to the tabloids and pop culture lately, you might have noticed that Britney has been… how to say this? Laying low.

Ever since canceling her lucrative and high-profile Las Vegas residency, the princess of pop has been busy with many things related to vacationing, nursing a broken foot (someone get her a plastic bubble, stat), and musing on the mysterious cheetah, which doesn’t speak English but can run 60 miles per hour. …


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Hop into Barbie’s bright pink convertible for a detour through 1990s rock-pop realness

Drag queen musicians are a dime a dozen these days; if you’re looking to extend your “RuPaul’s Drag Race” fame, then a buzzy single or two is the way to do it. Usually these songs are shameless dancefloor material that the queens can get down to during their live shows, or in the case of Alaska Thunderfuck, raunchy rap joints to match her signature sass.

Then there’s Trixie Mattel, who stands out from the rapidly-expanding crowd of drag artists and whose musical style is an unlikely complement to her colorful, over-the-top persona. Rooted in bluegrass and folk music on “Two Birds” and “One Stone,” Mattel shirks mainstream profitability for a style that is wholly her own, and one that feels organic and authentic. There’s a reason she won “RuPaul’s Drag Race: All-Stars 3,” and her impressive musical skills were certainly at play, as was her penchant for deliciously dark humor. If you haven’t heard her Christmas EP, “Homemade Christmas,” it’s time to get familiar. …

About

Matt Sevits

A recovering pop music addict who’s finding his way in the wide, wonderful world of music.

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